January 13th, 2009

cat in the snow

missing lanes

Apparently snow plows and sanders inadvertently eliminated a lane from the Aurora Bridge. Going in either direction, the reflectors and lines separating the second and third lanes have vanished. And since one of those lanes was a merging lane, it creates quite a bit of confusion for drivers now. You can actually see drivers swerving a bit or nearly going into another car because they don't realize anymore that there is another lane there. I first noticed it when emailerin and I were driving over the bridge to shop in Capitol Hill. She looked it up online and found that the snow plows had erased the lines.

I hope the city fixes this quickly.

In othe Seattle news, the Ballard Trader Joe's is scheduled to open at the end of February. I couldn't be happier. They have some exclusive essentials I can't live without and now I can go more often without having to drive up the hill to Queen Anne.
Pride & Prejudice

Butterfly Effect

So, anyone remember "The Butterfly Effect"?



Don't read any further if you don't want spoilers. The FX Chanel is running this movie over and over. And oddly enough, I can watch it over and over. I never get tired of it. As a girl with a learning disability, I can't stand mysteries or puzzles. I simply don't have access to the part of my brain that allows people to understand and solve these things. But for some reason the puzzle in this movie is fascinating, because there is no fixed answer. You just play dice with your life and the lives of the people you love, over and over, in an effort to fix things. And in the process, you break them and make the worse every time. And so I can't help but be riveted, wondering which turn of events and which action will finally put things right.

I think the ending is profound in a way that few movies or romance stories allow. Love, to our culture, is pretty selfish. It's all about how we feel and wanting that person so we can feel that way always. In this movie, it becomes totally and completely selfless. In the end, the protagonist realizes that the only way to save the woman he has loved since they were children together, is to hurt her and drive her away and give her up forever. And he does it. He loves her so much, that he gives her up forever so that she can be safe and happy. The answer to the mystery, to the puzzle that just got worse and worse as he tried to solve it, was to love completely and unconditionally and selflessly.